As soon as you quit, your body begins to repair the damage caused by smoking. Of course, it’s best to quit early in life but even someone who quits later in life will improve their health.

20 Minutes After Quitting:

  • Your heart rate drops to a normal level.

12 Hours After Quitting:

  • The carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal.

2 Weeks to 3 Months After Quitting:

  • Your risk of having a heart attack begins to drop.

  • Your lung function begins to improve.

1 to 9 Months After Quitting:

  • Your coughing and shortness of breath decrease.

1 Year After Quitting:

  • Your added risk of coronary heart disease is half that of a smoker’s.

5 to 15 Years After Quitting:

  • Your risk of having a stroke is reduced to that of a nonsmoker’s.

  • Your risk of getting cancer of the mouth, throat, or esophagus is half that of a smoker’s.

10 Years After Quitting:

  • Your risk of dying from lung cancer is about half that of a smoker’s.

  • Your risk of getting bladder cancer is half that of a smoker’s.

  • Your risk of getting cervical cancer or cancer of the larynx, kidney or pancreas decreases.

15 Years After Quitting:

  • Your risk of coronary heart disease is the same as that of a nonsmoker.